rnicrophone:

bombing:

cop: who the hell ordered all these pizzas

me: you said i got one phone call

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This rhetoric of “both sides” implies that pain and fault belong equally to Palestinians and Israelis. It erases manifold, unmistakable, qualitative and quantitative differences at play in Israel’s attack on the Gaza Strip and the political-historical context in which this is taking place — most centrally, that what is occurring is part of a settler-colonial invasion.

“Both sides” rhetoric refuses to make even the easiest, most obvious judgment, to which any honest evaluation of the information points: that Israel is massacring Palestinian adults and children, 77% of whom are civilians, and subjecting them to collective punishment; that Israel evidently claims for itself a right to extra-judicially execute anyone who it says is a Hamas member, a practice too few among even Palestine’s allies have denounced; that Israel is bombarding what is essentially a giant refugee camp home to an imprisoned population of a people Israel has ethnically cleansed, occupied, subjected to apartheid, and repeatedly slaughtered; that international law does not grant Israel a “right to defend itself” against the Gaza Strip. And that international law does grant Palestinians a right to resist using armed struggle.

To employ “both sides” rhetoric completely misrepresents the situation. It is not “both sides” who take thousands of political prisoners. Both sides do not systematically torture each other. Both sides do not control each other’s freedom of movement, or access to the sea, drinking water, and education.

Greg Shupak - "A Plague on One House" via Jacobin Magazine

In addition to these distinctions, the “both sides” idea is dangerous because it is immobilizing. With its use, it becomes impossible to demand an end to colonial practices. And that is exactly the point.

(via mizoguchi)

explodinghye:

choclety milk shakes likes his baths


Handpoked Lisianthus and bird wreath on Nanette.
By MagpieFeed

Handpoked Lisianthus and bird wreath on Nanette.

By MagpieFeed

i-like-butt:

"your homework still isn’t done? what have you been doing this whole time??"

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moth baby

moth baby

saccharinescorpion:

my major problem with Frozen is that it is a perfectly passable and average and safe Disney movie and people keep trying to prove that it is amazing and daring and challenging and in doing so keep churning out bombs of secondhand embarrassment like “look there’s some not-white people in the background, we’ve come so far since the 1950s” and “Anna isn’t your typical perfect Disney beauty, she has freckles and eyebrows that are .5% thicker than Rapunzel’s”

things we hated as children: being spanked and naps
things we love as adults: being spanked and naps

chromeofficial:

chromeofficial:

chromeofficial:

what do u call a backstabbing grocer

traitor joe

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Autism isn’t something a person has, or a “shell” that a person is trapped inside. There’s no normal child hidden behind the autism. Autism is a way of being. It is pervasive; it colors every experience, every sensation, perception, thought, emotion, and encounter, every aspect of existence. It is not possible to separate the autism from the person—and if it were possible, the person you’d have left would not be the same person you started with.

This is important, so take a moment to consider it: Autism is a way of being. It is not possible to separate the person from the autism.

Therefore, when parents say,

I wish my child did not have autism,

what they’re really saying is,

I wish the autistic child I have did not exist, and I had a different (non-autistic) child instead.

Read that again. This is what we hear when you mourn over our existence. This is what we hear when you pray for a cure. This is what we know, when you tell us of your fondest hopes and dreams for us: that your greatest wish is that one day we will cease to be, and strangers you can love will move in behind our faces.

Jim Sinclair, “Don’t Mourn For Us” x (via andrandiriel)